It couldn’t be more beautiful this time of year especially in New England. In the town I live in, the trees are bursting with shades of red, orange, yellow and green, the weather is still warm enough to take my kids for a pre-dinner stroll and the fruits and vegetables that are in-season are simply delicious. When it comes to healthy fall foods to feed your kids, the options couldn’t be better. Here are 10 to incorporate into your meals.

1. Cauliflower

With a mild but slightly sweet, nutty taste, cauliflower is one of the healthy fall foods you can add to any meal. Cauliflower is a good source of fiber, protein, potassium, folate and vitamins C, K and B6.

Steam cauliflower, use the food processor to make cauliflower “rice,” or add some milk and a small amount of grass-fed butter and use the immersion blender to make a better-for-you version of mashed potatoes.

2. Butternut squash

There are so many types of winter squash but butternut squash is one of the most delicious and nutritious. Butternut squash is a good source of vitamins A, C and B6, folate, calcium, magnesium and potassium.

Sprinkle a bit of cinnamon on cubed butternut squash and roast it alone or with pumpkin and sweet potatoes, or puree cooked squash into a delicious warm soup for brisk autumn night.

3. Apples

Going apple picking with your family isn’t just a fun activity but a great way to get kids interested in healthy eating. Apples are an excellent source of fiber, antioxidants and vitamin C and make a great addition to oatmeal, baked goods or as a snack.

4. Pumpkin

When it comes to healthy fall foods to feed your kids, pumpkin is a nutritional powerhouse. Pumpkin is a rich source of vitamins and minerals, filling fiber and lutein, an antioxidant well known for eye health. Roast fresh pumpkin with cinnamon or mix pureed pumpkin into baked goods for a healthy, delicious treat.

5. Sweet potatoes

It wasn’t until recently that my kids found out that not all potatoes are sweet potatoes. I rarely purchase any other type because sweet potatoes are by far the healthiest. Sweet potatoes are a great source of fiber, potassium, vitamins A, C and B6.

They’re also versatile: swap toast for roasted cubes of sweet potatoes for breakfast, make sweet potato hash, add them to a salad or cut them up and make sweet potato fries as a side dish for dinner.

6. Figs

An excellent source of fiber and rich in calcium and potassium, figs may even ward off colds and infections this school year. Fresh or dried, figs make a great addition to your kid’s lunch box, or as an after-school snack or a healthy after-dinner treat.

7. Pomegranates

The tiny, bright colored seeds of pomegranate are a good source of folate and vitamins C and K. Surprisingly, they’re also a great way to get fiber in your kid’s diet: a 1/2 cup has 3 grams.

Add pomegranate seeds to yogurt, salads or any fruit salad.

8. Kale

Kale is a good source of fiber, protein, iron, calcium and potassium and vitamins A, C, K, B6.

Blend kale into a morning smoothie, add it to a frittata, serve as a salad or sauté it with olive oil and a sprinkle of salt for dinner.

9. Parsnips

A root vegetable, parsnips are rich in fiber, potassium, vitamin C and folate.

Puree parsnips into soups, roast them in the oven or sauté them with your favorite herbs and spices for a delicious side dish at dinner.

10. Brussels sprouts

I know what you’re thinking: there’s no way my kid’s going to eat Brussels sprouts, but if you serve them regularly, chances are your kids will come around. Brussels sprouts are a great source of vitamins A, C, K, B6, potassium, folate and iron.

Blanch or roast Brussels sprouts and add a bit of balsamic vinegar, nuts or raisins.